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Living in Bavaria

by leo.libby Online Now Mar 7, 2012 at 11:02 PM

Hello. My question is really directed at Bad Aibling (where I served in the Army). However, for simplicity, consider it --Bavaria--.

1. How much will it cost to live there? Are there opportunities to simply live with a family and pay some rent? space is not an issue.

2. How easy is it to find work? I am disabled (walking), so all i can do is non physical stuff. I will have a ba anthropology soon. how about teaching english or tutoring?

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13 Answers
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Re: Living in Bavaria

    by leics Online Now Mar 7, 2012 at 11:19 PM

    If you are not an EU citizen (US?) and wish to stay more than 90 days you will need to apply for a residence permit. You cannot work before this is granted.

    If you wish to teach English it would be a good idea to obtain a TEFL certificate beforehand. Most private teaching posts require this (I do not think you could teach in the school system without further qualifications) and you will have much more choice if you are qualified (and better pay rates too). You will also know better *how* to teach English and will be more attractive to prospective clients. But I do not think Germany is short of English teachers. The language is taught throughout the school system.

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Re: Living in Bavaria

    by Kathrin_E Online Now Mar 7, 2012 at 11:22 PM

    You are not mentioning your citizenship - do I assume correctly that you are American since you mention the Army? The first problem you have to solve concerns the words "visa" and "work permit". How about that?

    Teaching English? What is your qualification? Just being a native speaker does not count. English teachers in Germany have full university training, i.e. the equivalent of a Masters' degree in English plus a second subject and pedagogy. Private tutoring does not pay your rent, let alone the living for a family, and is no reason for the state to grant you a work permit. In any application process the potential employer has to prove first that there is no candidate with EU citizenship who can do the job better than you.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Re: Living in Bavaria

    by leics Online Now Mar 7, 2012 at 11:26 PM

    Kathrin makes a very good point.

    I'll re-state it for emphasis: in EU countries, employers must show that no EU citizen can be found to fill a post (any post, not just teaching) before a work permit/visa can be granted. So in many/most cases it's a case of getting job before being able to get a work permit/visa rather than the other way round.

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  • Re: Living in Bavaria

    by leo.libby Online Now Mar 8, 2012 at 12:14 AM

    I am American. I have researched many TEFL / CELTA certificates as well and am considering enrolling in a CELTA program this summer. My question was just about what is available, not work permits. I can ask the consulate about work permits. Anyway, I know one TEFL site has information on working in diffeqrent countries... I'll post it at the bottom. Furthermore, I am disabled, so I will receive monetary assistance from ths US. My interest in working is not fueled by a need to pay rent, but a desire to do something meaningful with my life.

    oxfordseminars.com/esl-count...

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Re: Living in Bavaria

    by Kathrin_E Online Now Mar 8, 2012 at 12:33 AM

    I am German and I am shaking my head about how they describe the work options in Germany on that website. Sounds rather unrealistic to me - maybe for Brits and Irish this applies. I hope you noticed the lines "EU citizenship preferred" and "Employer must be willing to sponsor visa".

    Concerning private tutoring, there is no mentioning of the fact that private tutors are usually self-employed, and no freelancer can survive on 10 € per hour, even with 30 € per hour this is hardly possible because of all the additional costs, like 100% insurance and such. German schools teach British English, so for tutoring kids an American accent won't be wanted. There are options for teaching adults, like business English and conversation classes, but there are many well-qualified applicants. How good is your German?

    If you are financially self-sufficient from the US you can be granted a long-term visa in Germany, but the work permit is an entirely different story.

    There is no need for that harsh undertone if you expect people to help you, by the way...

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  • Re: Living in Bavaria

    by leo.libby Online Now Mar 8, 2012 at 12:42 AM

    Points taken.... I would not enroll in an Oxford seminars course... they have too many bad reviews

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  • Re: Living in Bavaria

    by leo.libby Online Now Mar 8, 2012 at 12:44 AM

    I can't speak German, which I suppose makes work an unrealistic option.

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  • Ina08's Profile Photo

    Re: Living in Bavaria

    by Ina08 Online Now Mar 8, 2012 at 1:08 AM

    There are many private language schools such as "Inlingua" "Wall Street Institute" etc (see website www.leo.org and the ads on the side bars). These are not so strict with the type of English (British or otherwise) as they generally have a very high turn over (been there and know it first hand).

    Some kind of certificate for English as a foreign language (EFL) would most certainly help and at least some rudimental knowledge of German as well. The latter on both accounts: to better integrate in the environment and to better understand the challenges of a learner when approaching English.

    The fact that you are disabled is secondary in my view and won't earn you any points either way (positive or negative). It is your capabilities that are on the stand.

    Hope this helps and good luck.

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  • hawkhead's Profile Photo

    Re: Living in Bavaria

    by hawkhead Online Now Mar 8, 2012 at 5:32 AM

    As you have also posted this question in a similar topic in forums relating to the Philippines, I think at the moment you are just looking at options. Regardless of the fact that you wish to stick to the specifics of your questions, visas and residence permits and qualifications are all relevant and will play a significant role in any decision. As one poster says, Germany is hardly short of English teachers but there may be opportunities, with the correct papers, to teach in one of the schools for immigrants.

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  • Turtleshell's Profile Photo

    Re: Living in Bavaria

    by Turtleshell Online Now Mar 8, 2012 at 11:13 PM

    1) ~1,000 EUR for rent (3 rooms, ~1,000/1.050 sqft) + EUR 20 telephone and Internet flat + 70 or more for electricity (yes, that much).
    Food: Well, I am single and spend about 400 EUR / month on food, but I think I could do with less, even though I don't eat meat daily.
    I guess you'll need a car which I don't, so I cannot help you here, but gas/diesel alone is significantly more expensive in Germany than it is in the USA.
    Plus health insurance if you aren't covered.

    2) Barely possible, sad but true for reasons already mentioned. While unemployment is comparatively low in Bavaria (4.2%), I don't see any need for an English teacher in small towns like Bad Aibling or Bad Tölz (place of another former Garrison).
    Sometimes companies want a native English speaker, but that would be in Munich more than in Bad Aibling, and without any knowledge of German: sorry, I'd rather try selling cakes at the local farmers' market.

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Re: Living in Bavaria

    by Kathrin_E Online Now Mar 9, 2012 at 10:02 AM

    Even selling cakes at the local farmers market requires being able to communicate with the customers, i.e. sufficient skills in German and some grasp of the Bavarian dialect.

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  • Turtleshell's Profile Photo

    Re: Living in Bavaria

    by Turtleshell Online Now Mar 9, 2012 at 11:18 AM

    KShezz, I had just taken a look at some flats to rent in Bad Aibling. I wouldn't say Bad Tölz was any cheaper. However, I had already included additional costs for heating and water which I understand is not the case with your mortgage?

    Southern Bavaria is an expensive place to live, and I dare say rents increased by roughly 50 percent over the past ten years.

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  • Turtleshell's Profile Photo

    Re: Living in Bavaria

    by Turtleshell Online Now Mar 9, 2012 at 11:27 AM

    Kathrin_E,

    > and some grasp of the Bavarian dialect.

    Ah yes, the widespread Bavarian throat inflammation. Coming from northern Germany, I still have difficulties now and then.

    The little German he needs, however, shouldn't be much of a problem. After a couple of months he should do well. Question is if the original poster can stand for a couple of hours. Besides, he needs a health certificate of course and would have to allow food inspectors to check his place. But I digress ...

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