Burundi Travel Answers

change location
LanaFromRiga's Profile Photo

Is it necessity of inoculations?

by LanaFromRiga Online Now Feb 6, 2013 at 11:02 PM

Hello! My husband will go to Burundi in the end of February. Please tell me about your experience in Burundi. Is it obligatory make inoculations before? Or it is possible to stay there without them? Thank you!!!

Quote & Answer
9 Answers
  • cgf's Profile Photo

    Re: Is it necessity of inoculations?

    by cgf Online Now Feb 6, 2013 at 11:36 PM

    you better do it and do not waste time, it's short time before end of February.
    I.E. vaccine used against yellow fever could take also two weeks before it began effective, theb it would be fine for 10 years.

    Be the first to rate this answer!

    Was this helpful? Quote & Answer
  • LanaFromRiga's Profile Photo

    Re: Is it necessity of inoculations?

    by LanaFromRiga Online Now Feb 7, 2013 at 12:31 AM

    Is anyone went there without incoulations?

    Be the first to rate this answer!

    Was this helpful? Quote & Answer
  • taurean_traveller's Profile Photo

    Re: Is it necessity of inoculations?

    by taurean_traveller Online Now Feb 7, 2013 at 12:42 AM

    Hello Lana and welcome!
    It is not for us here to advise on innoculations, better your Doctor or Health centre.
    If anyone did go somewhere whithout protection,then it is the risk they take.
    The general opinion on similar questions is that it is better to be safe rather than sorry!

    Be the first to rate this answer!

    Was this helpful? Quote & Answer
  • LanaFromRiga's Profile Photo

    Re: Is it necessity of inoculations?

    by LanaFromRiga Online Now Feb 7, 2013 at 1:25 AM

    You're absolutely right! Thanks!

    Be the first to rate this answer!

    Was this helpful? Quote & Answer
  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    Re: Is it necessity of inoculations?

    by angiebabe Online Now Feb 7, 2013 at 1:41 AM

    Hi we stayed for 8 days about 3 years ago to see locals and were looked after by locals - they took all care while we there for our safety and well being - such as one of our hosts supervising the cook that was hired to look after our meals when not eating as guests with other locals.

    while Im here answering your question may i take the opportunity to add that you might like to take things to take advantage of the large baggage allowance if you are into humanitary things such as clothes to give away to people in hospitals or even go and donate to release patients from hospital that are locked in because they cant afford to pay their bill nor have anyone to give them any proper food....

    back to your question Yellow Fever vaccinaton is compulsory - our yellow cards werent checked but it is compulsory. but is the only obligatory shot. Your travel medical centre will advise you but as you are going into a malaria mosquito region yes you need anti-malarials for Burundi also - the yellow fever shot is for the mosquitoes that are around in the day and the antimalarials for the ones at night - so you need good mosquito repellent and to stay in places with mosquito nets or take your own. The antimalarial I decided to take was the one that started only 2 days before or something and then continues for a certain period after you get back..so you have time no probs with your short notice.

    Im a nurse so I have Hep B already on board but I keep up my Hep A status since needing it for trips to China and now the shots last for 10-20 years so its a bargain. Good for any poor food handling or hygiene you dont know about. Have tetanus status up to date and it worth having cholera shots in case of also any poor hygiene, water and food handling..stick to bottled water too.

    Be the first to rate this answer!

    Was this helpful? Quote & Answer
  • balfor's Profile Photo

    Re: Is it necessity of inoculations?

    by balfor Online Now Feb 7, 2013 at 2:58 AM

    According the US Centers for Disease Control, you should have quite a few shots prior to travel to Burundi.

    wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destina...

    Vaccination or Disease Recommendations or Requirements for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases
    Routine
    Recommended if you are not up-to-date with routine shots, such as measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) vaccine, poliovirus vaccine, etc.

    Hepatitis A or immune globulin (IG)
    Recommended for all unvaccinated people traveling to or working in countries with an intermediate or high level of hepatitis A virus infection (see map) where exposure might occur through food or water. Cases of travel-related hepatitis A can also occur in travelers to developing countries with "standard" tourist itineraries, accommodations, and food consumption behaviors.

    Hepatitis B
    Recommended for all unvaccinated persons traveling to or working in countries with intermediate to high levels of endemic HBV transmission (see map), especially those who might be exposed to blood or body fluids, have sexual contact with the local population, or be exposed through medical treatment (e.g., for an accident).

    Typhoid Recommended for all unvaccinated people traveling to or working in East Africa, especially if staying with friends or relatives or visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where exposure might occur through food or water.
    Polio
    Recommended for adult travelers who have received a primary series with either inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) or oral polio vaccine (OPV). They should receive another dose of IPV before departure. For adults, available data do not indicate the need for more than a single lifetime booster dose with IPV.

    Yellow Fever
    Requirements: Required upon arrival from all countries if traveler is ≥1 year of age.

    Recommendations: Recommended for all travelers ≥9 months of age.

    Vaccination should be given 10 days before travel and at 10-year intervals if there is on-going risk. Find an authorized U.S. yellow fever vaccination clinic.

    Rabies Recommended for travelers spending a lot of time outdoors, especially in rural areas, involved in activities such as bicycling, camping, or hiking. Also recommended for travelers with significant occupational risks (such as veterinarians), for long-term travelers and expatriates living in areas with a significant risk of exposure, and for travelers involved in any activities that might bring them into direct contact with bats, carnivores, and other mammals. Children are considered at higher risk because they tend to play with animals, may receive more severe bites, or may not report bites.

    Be the first to rate this answer!

    Was this helpful? Quote & Answer
  • cgf's Profile Photo

    Re: Is it necessity of inoculations?

    by cgf Online Now Feb 7, 2013 at 4:01 AM

    against tetanus and typhoid should be done 'normally'
    diphtheria also in some area of north hemisphere where you'd never believed the need of

    Be the first to rate this answer!

    Was this helpful? Quote & Answer
  • LanaFromRiga's Profile Photo

    Re: Is it necessity of inoculations?

    by LanaFromRiga Online Now Feb 7, 2013 at 6:02 AM

    It is more or less clear with my first question. Thanks for all of you!
    I reaad about many snakes in this region? is it true? How to protect myself from them?

    Be the first to rate this answer!

    Was this helpful? Quote & Answer
  • sphynxxs's Profile Photo

    Re: Is it necessity of inoculations?

    by sphynxxs Online Now Feb 9, 2013 at 8:59 AM

    you do not have to worry about snakes unless you are in a rural area and staying in local huts where snakes might sneak in. In all my time in Africa I never had trouble with snakes. Ants, mozzies, bugs getting into the food, yes, but not a singke snake around.

    Be the first to rate this answer!

    Was this helpful? Quote & Answer
Your Answer
Advanced Editor View Guidelines

Popular Burundi Travel Answer Locations